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400 "City of Toronto" Squadron (RCAF)

Percussuri Vigiles - King George VI, September 1942
Adopted By: City of Toronto, Ontario

History of the Squadron before and during World War II (Aircraft:Lysander III, Tomahawk I, IIA, IIB, Mustang I, Mosquito PR Mk. XVI, Spitfire PR Mk. XII)

The squadron started life as No. 10 (Army Co-Operation) Squadron (Auxiliary) at Toronto in October 1932. In November 1937 the unit was renumbered No 110. On the outbreak of WWII, the squadron was mobilized and moved to Rockcliffe, ON, to train on Westland Lysander aircraft, having previously flown de Havilland DH-60 Moth, Fleet Fawn, Avro 621 Tutor, Avro 626, and de Havilland DH-82 Tiger Moth. The squadron arrived in England in February 1940. The squadron did not see action and with the fall of France, it remained in England, and was later renumbered as No. 400 (Army Cooperation) Squadron at Odiham, Hampshire, UK on March 1, 1941.

From then until 3 December 1942 the squadron was affiliated to No. 39 (Army Co-operation) Wing (RCAF), then it moved to Fighter Command (No 10 Group) at Dunsfold, Surrey. In December 1942 and January 1943 a section of aircraft flew in No 19 Group of Coastal Command providing fighter cover over the Bay of Biscay from airfields at Portreath and Trebelzue, Cornwall. The squadron rejoined 10 Group and then rapidly returned in January 1943 to No 39 Army Co-operation Wing, by now designated as a Fighter Reconnaissance (FR) Squadron. It then formed part of the 2nd Tactical Air Force, based successively at Woodchurch, Kent, Redhill, Surrey and Odiham, Hampshire. With squadron code letters SP, the squadron flew Curtiss Tomahawks, North American Mustangs and Supermarine Spitfires on photo-reconnaissance work, collecting intelligence information to help to plan the D-Day invasion, and later on the effects of bombing of V-1 launch sites. From December 1943 to May 1944 the squadron aircraft included 6 Mosquito PR Mk XVI. Shortly after D-day the Squadron moved to airfields in France, and provided tactical photographic reconnaissance for the British Second Army. As the armies moved forwards, the squadron followed, flying from bases in France, Belgium, The Netherlands and Germany. The squadron was finally disbanded at Luneburg, Germany in August 1945.

In the course of the war, the squadron flew around 3000 sorties, for the loss of 12 pilots killed or missing. They destroyed numbers of enemy aircraft and attacked numerous trains and locomotives. They were awarded 10 DFC's, 1 Bar to DFC, 1 BEM, 3 MiD's. Battle Honours include Fortress Europe 1941–44, Dieppe, France and Germany 1944–45, Normandy 1944, Arnhem, Rhine, Biscay 1942–43 Kostenuk and Griffin

Maps for Movements of 400 Squadron 1940-45

MAP 1: 400 Squadron Movements in Britain 1940-44, (right-click on image to display enlarged in new tab)
MAP 2: 400 Squadron Movements in Europe 1944-45

400 Sqn History Summary 1939-45

400 Sqn History Summary 1939-45 Page 2

400 Sqn History Summary 1939-45 Page 3

History of the Squadron Post-WWII (Aircraft: Harvard III, Vampire III, Sabre V, Expeditor, Otter, Kiowa, Griffin)

No. 400 Squadron reformed at RCAF Station Downsview, ONtario on 15 April 1946 as an Auxiliary Fighter-Bomber Squadron, and later as an Auxiliary Fighter Squadron, operating North American Harvard Mk IIB. At the start of the Cold War the squadron flew de Havilland Vampire Mk IIIs and then Canadair Sabre Mk.V aircraft. It was re-named No. 400 "City of Toronto" (Fighter) Squadron on 6 November 1952, and then re-designated No. 400 “City of Toronto” Sqn (Aux) on 1 October 1958, when it was reassigned to a light transport and emergency rescue function and was equipped with Beechcraft Expeditor (1958) and de Havilland Otter (1960) aircraft. These aircraft were flown throughout the 1960s and 1970s.

Unification of the Canadian Forces brought about another name change, this time to 400 "City of Toronto" Air Reserve Squadron on 1 February 1968. In 1980, the conversion to helicopters began with the CH-136 Kiowa. The squadron received its current name in the 1980s, becoming 400 Tactical Helicopter and Training Squadron. The squadron moved to CFB Borden, Ontario in 1996 after the closure of CFB Downsview, and is now equipped with the CH-146 Griffon.

During peacetime, the squadron fulfills 1 Wing commitments by providing operational and training support to the 4th Canadian Division, the defence of Canadian sovereignty, support to national taskings, and support to peacekeeping operations. Its secondary duties are to support search and rescue operations of the Royal Canadian Air Force.

General Government of Canada RCAF Website

Loading... loading (34) personnel records
Nationality ⬆⬇
Name ⬆⬇
WarStatus ⬆⬇
EventDate ⬆⬇
Aircraft ⬆⬇
 
Serial ⬆⬇
Flight Lieutenant
KIA
1944‑02‑20
Mosquito
PR.Mk. XVI
MM277
Flight Lieutenant
KIFA
1951‑08‑25
Vampire
Mk. III
17051
Pilot Officer
KIA
1942‑08‑19
Mustang
Mk. Ia
AM151
Flying Officer
KIA
1943‑06‑02
Mustang
Mk. I
AM256
Pilot Officer
KIA
1944‑02‑20
Mosquito
PR.Mk. XVI
MM277
Flying Officer
KIFA
1949‑07‑05
Harvard
Mk.IIB / IIA
3121
Flying Officer
KIA
1943‑07‑15
Mustang
Mk. I
AG659
Flying Officer
KIA
1942‑11‑22
Master
I
N8067
Pilot Officer
KIA
1941‑12‑13
Tomahawk
I
AH865
Pilot Officer
KIA
1942‑05‑25
Tomahawk
IIA
AH889
Flying Officer
KIA
1943‑01‑20
Mustang
Mk. I
AG589
Wing Commander
KIFA
1952‑03‑08
Vampire
Mk. III
17005
Leading Aircraftman
1942‑05‑29
 
 
 
Flight Lieutenant
KIA
1943‑09‑28
Mustang
Mk. I
AG577
Sergeant
Died
1941‑07‑05
 
 
 
Flying Officer
KIFA
1951‑07‑01
Harvard
Mk.II
2696
Pilot Officer
KIA
1941‑12‑13
Tomahawk
I
AH865
Flying Officer
KIA
1944‑01‑03
Mustang
Mk. I
AP191
Flight Lieutenant
KIA
1944‑10‑28
Spitfire
PR Mk XI
PL925
Flying Officer
KIFA
1951‑07‑01
Harvard
Mk.II
2696
Flying Officer
KIA
1941‑05‑21
Lysander
Mk. IIIA
V9361
Flight Lieutenant
KIA
1942‑07‑21
Mustang
Mk. I
AG540
Flying Officer
KIFA
1944‑07‑28
Spitfire
PR Mk XI
PL829
Flight Lieutenant
KIA
1945‑05‑09
Spitfire
PR Mk XI
PM142
Sergeant
Killed
1941‑04‑17
 
 
 
Flight Lieutenant
KIA
1942‑02‑08
Tomahawk
I
AH747
Pilot Officer
KIA
1942‑06‑06
Tomahawk
I
AH818
Flight Lieutenant
KIA
1942‑02‑08
Moth, Tiger
ll
R4952
Flying Officer
KIA
1943‑10‑05
Mustang
Mk. I
AP173
Flight Lieutenant
PoW
1943‑04‑17
Mustang
Mk. I
AG528
Flight Lieutenant
KIA
1941‑05‑22
Tomahawk
I
AH810
Flying Officer
KIFA
1952‑06‑02
Mustang
TF Mk. IV
9589
Flying Officer
KIFA
1953‑11‑29
Vampire
Mk. III
17081
Flying Officer
KIFA
1952‑03‑08
Vampire
Mk. III
17057

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