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Watt, Ernest Rae ()

Male Head

Birth Date: 1897-09-11 (age )

Service
RAF
Unit
46 (F) Sqn- Squadron (RAF)
We Rise To Conquer
Rank
Lieutenant
Marshal
Air Chief MarshalA/C/M
Air MarshalA/M
Air Vice MarshalA/V/M
Air CommodoreA/C
Group CaptainG/C
Wing CommanderW/C
Squadron LeaderS/L
Flight LieutenantF/L
Flying OfficerF/O
Pilot OfficerP/O
Warrant Officer 1st ClassWO1
Warrant Officer 2nd ClassWO2
Flight SergeantFS
SergeantSGT
CorporalCPL
Senior AircraftmanSAC
Leading AircraftmanLAC
Aircraftman 1st ClassAC1
Aircraftman 2nd ClassAC2
Position
pilot
Service Numbers
RFC General List 1918-03-24: posted to 45 Sqn 1918-04-20: OK in C-6722, Sopwith Camel, stalled on landing from OP. 2Lt ER Watt Ok

Sopwith Camel

By unknown RAF photographer - gallery link image link, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=8473883

The Sopwith Camel became the most successful British fighter of the First World War. The Sopwith F.1 and 2F.1 Camel first went into operations on the Western Front in 1917 and then served in virtually every theatre of Royal Flying Corps (RFC), Royal Naval Air Service (RNAS) and Royal Air Force (RAF) service. Several Canadian aces used the Camel as their mount. The Camel was very manoeuvrable, and it could be tricky to fly in the hands of a novice pilot. For experienced pilots, however, the aircraft proved to be a superb fighter.

The Camel's machine-guns were mounted on the forward fuselage with their breeches enclosed in a faired metal cowling "hump" that gave the Camel its name. Several Camels were also shipped to Canada in the post-war period as part of an Imperial gift. Three registered Sopwith F.1 Camels entered service with the RCAF at Camp Borden in 1924. The following year, the RCAF purchased seven additional aircraft to provide further spares for the active aircraft. These latter aircraft were in fact 2F.1 models that had been "navalized" variants. Used primarily by wartime experienced fighter pilots for refresher training, the Camels lasted another five years before finally being scrapped. Wikipedia

YouTube Sopwith Camel

Wkikpedia Wikipedia Sopwith Camel

General Harold A Skaarup Web Page

Kestrek Publications Sopwith Camel - Kestrel Publications

CASPIR Aircraft Groups:
RCAF On Strength (10), Canadian Aircraft Losses (41)
last update: 2021-12-21 00:32:56

Camel C6722


46 (F) Sqn- Squadron (RAF) We Rise To Conquer

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