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Cockaday, Arthur John (Sergeant)

Prisoner of War 1943-04-15

Male Head

Age:

Home: Brantford, Ontario

Service
RCAF
Unit
424 (B) Sqn- Squadron
Castigandos Castigamus (Chastise those deserving)
Rank
Sergeant
Marshal
Air Chief MarshalA/C/M
Air MarshalA/M
Air Vice MarshalA/V/M
Air CommodoreA/C
Group CaptainG/C
Wing CommanderW/C
Squadron LeaderS/L
Flight LieutenantF/L
Flying OfficerF/O
Pilot OfficerP/O
Warrant Officer 1st ClassWO1
Warrant Officer 2nd ClassWO2
Flight SergeantFS
SergeantSGT
CorporalCPL
Senior AircraftmanSAC
Leading AircraftmanLAC
Aircraftman 1st ClassAC1
Aircraftman 2nd ClassAC2
Position
Rear Gunner
Service Numbers
R/90414

Wellington B. Mk. X HZ273

Bombing Stuttgart Germany 1943-April-14 to 1943-April-15

462 aircraft- 146 Wellingtons, 135 Halifaxes, 98 Lancasters, 83 Stirlings. 23 aircraft - 8 Stirlings, 8 Wellingtons, 4 Halifaxes, 3 Lancasters - lost, 5.0 per cent of the force.

The Pathfinders claimed to have marked the centre. of this normally difficult target accurately but the main bombing area developed to the north-east, along the line of approach of the bombing force. This was an example of the 'creep back', a feature of large raids which occurred when. Main Force crews- and some Pathfinder backers-up - failed to· press through to the centre of the marking area but bombed - of re-marked - the earliest markers visible. Bomber Command was never able to eliminate the creep back tendency and much bombing fell outside city areas because of it

On this night the creep back extended over the suburb of Bad Canstatt, which was of an industrial nature, and some useful damage was caused, particularly in the large railway-repair workshops situated there. The neighbouring districts of Munster and Miihlhausen were also hit and the majority of the 393 buildings destroyed and 942 severely damaged and the 200-plus civilian casualties were in these northern areas.

Only a few bombs fell in the centre of Stuttgart but the old Gedachtnis church was destroyed. In the district of Gaisburg, just east of the centre, 1 bomb scored a direct hit on an air-raid shelter packed with French and Russian prisoners of war. 257 Frenchmen and 143 Russians were killed. This tragedy brought the total death roll in Stuttgart to 619, a new record for raids to Germany

.

Used by No. 424 Squadron, RCAF, in the UK, mid 1943, coded "QB*G". Shot down while on a mission to Stuttgart on 15 April 1943. All crew baled and were captured POW.

The aircraft took off at RAF Topcliffe at 21:12 hrs, on a raid to Stuttgart, Germany. The aircraft crashed at an unknown location, for unknown reasons. The aircrew were all made POWs: Sgt Arthur Robert Harrison RCAF Pilot F/Sgt Frank Rath RCAF Navigator Sgt J Malkin RAF Bomb Aimer Sgt Edward Alexander McQuarrie RCAF W-AG Sgt Arthur John Cockaday, RCAF Rear Gunner

Crew on Wellington B. Mk. X HZ273

Vickers Wellington

Source: Harold A Skaarup Web Page
Vickers Wellington B. Mk. III (Serial No. X3763), coded KW-E, No. 425 'Alouette' (B) Squadron, RCAF, late summer of 1942

The Vickers Wellington was a British twin-engined, long-range medium bomber. It was designed during the mid-1930s at Brooklands in Weybridge, Surrey. Led by Vickers-Armstrongs' chief designer Rex Pierson, a key feature of the aircraft is its geodetic airframe fuselage structure, which was principally designed by Barnes Wallis. Development had been started in response to Air Ministry Specification B.9/32, issued in the middle of 1932, for a bomber for the Royal Air Force. This specification called for a twin-engined day bomber capable of delivering higher performance than any previous design.

The Wellington was used as a night bomber in the early years of the Second World War, performing as one of the principal bombers used by Bomber Command. During 1943, it started to be superseded as a bomber by the larger four-engined "heavies" such as the Avro Lancaster. The Wellington continued to serve throughout the war in other duties, particularly as an anti-submarine aircraft.

It holds the distinction of having been the only British bomber that was produced for the duration of the war, and of having been produced in a greater quantity than any other British-built bomber. The Wellington remained as first-line equipment when the war ended, although it had been increasingly relegated to secondary roles. The Wellington was one of two bombers named after Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington, the other being the Vickers Wellesley.

In August 1936, an initial order for 180 Wellington Mk I aircraft, powered by a pair of 1,050 hp (780 kW) Bristol Pegasus radial engines, was received by Vickers; it had been placed so rapidly that the order occurred prior to the first meeting intended to decide the details of the production aircraft. In October 1937, another order for a further 100 Wellington Mk Is, produced by the Gloster Aircraft Company, was issued; it was followed by an order for 100 Wellington Mk II aircraft with Rolls-Royce Merlin X V12 engines. Yet another order was placed for 64 Wellingtons produced by Armstrong Whitworth Aircraft. With this flurry of order and production having been assured by the end of 1937, Vickers set about simplifying the manufacturing process of the aircraft and announced a target of building one Wellington per day.

A total of 180 Wellington Mk I aircraft were built; 150 for the RAF and 30 for the Royal New Zealand Air Force (RNZAF) (which were transferred to the RAF on the outbreak of war and used by 75 Squadron). In October 1938, the Mk I entered service with 9 Squadron. The Wellington was initially outnumbered by the Handley Page Hampden (also ordered by the Ministry to B.9/32) and the Armstrong Whitworth Whitley (to B.34/3 for a 'night' bomber) but outlasted both rival aircraft in service. The Wellington went on to be built in 16 separate variants, in addition to two training conversions after the war. The number of Wellingtons built totalled 11,462 of all versions, a greater quantity produced than any other British bomber. On 13 October 1945, the last Wellington to be produced rolled out. Wikipedia

Wkikpedia Wikipedia Vickers Wellington

General RCAF - Vickers Wellington

YouTube YouTube Vickers Wellington documentary

General Harold A Skaarup Web Page

CASPIR Aircraft Groups:
RCAF 400 Squadron (1), Canadian Aircraft Losses (1217), Canadian Ferried (1)
last update: 2021-08-30 20:19:05

Wellington B. Mk. X HZ273


424 (B) Sqn- Squadron Castigandos Castigamus ("Tiger")

History of the Squadron during World War II (Aircraft: Wellington III, X, Halifax III, Lancaster I, III)

424 Squadron was the sixth RCAF bomber squadron to be formed overseas in WWII, at Topcliffe, Yorkshire, UK on October 15, 1942, originally as part of No 4 Group of RAF Bomber Command. It remained at Topcliffe when it was transferred to the newly-formed 6 (RCAF) Group on January 1, 1943. It moved to Leeming, Yorkshire , and then Dalton, Yorkshire , flying Vickers Wellington Mk III and X aircraft before being dispatched on June 22, 1943 to No 331 (RCAF) Wing of No 205 Group in Tunisia (Kairouan/Zina and Hani East airfields), from where it flew in support of the invasions of Sicily and Italy. It returned by sea to Skipton-on-Swale, Yorkshire in October/November 1943. It re-equipped with Handley Page Halifax Mk III aircraft, which it flew until January 1945, when it re-equipped with Avro Lancaster I and III aircraft. After the termination of hostilities in Europe, the squadron was transferred to No 1 Group, and was employed in operation DODGE, the repatriation of British and Canadian troops from Italy. It was disbanded at Skipton on October 15, 1945, 3 years to the day since its formation.

In the course of hostilities, the squadron flew 3257 sorties for the loss of 52 aircraft. 8776 tons of bombs were dropped. Crew members were awarded 1 DSO, 49 DFC's and 1 Bar to DFC, 1 CGM, 11 DFM's and 1 MiD. Battle Honours were: English Channel and North Sea 1943-45, Baltic 1944-45, Fortress Europe 1943-44, France and Germany 1944-45, Biscay Ports 1943-44, Ruhr 1943-45, Berlin 1944, German Ports 1943-45, Nornamdy 1944, Rhine, Bisacy 1943-44, Sicily 1943, Italy 1943, Salerno.Wikipedia, Kostenuk and Griffin

Squadron History (Bomber Command Museum PDF)

Maps for Movements of 424 Squadron 1942-45

MAP 1: 424 Squadron Movements 1942-45 (right-click on image to display enlarged in new tab)
MAP 2: 424 Squadron Movements 1942-45 (detail of Map 1)
MAP 3: 424 Squadron Movements in North Africa 1943
MAP 4: 6 Group Bomber Bases in Yorkshire and Durham, 1943-45

424 Squadron History Summary 1942-45

424 Squadron History Summary 1942-45 Page 2

History of the Squadron Post-WWII (Aircraft: Harvard II, Mustang IV, Silver Star 3, Expeditor, Otter, Griffon, Hercules)

The squadron was re-formed at Mount Hope, Hamilton, Ontario on 15 April 1946, as a light bomber unit. It was redesignated as an auxiliary fighter unit on 1 April 1947. It flew North American Harvard II and Mustang IV aircraft in a fighter role, as well as Canadair Silver Star aircraft until 1 September 1957 when it was then reassigned as a light transport and emergency rescue role and re-equipped with Beechcraft Expeditor and de Havilland Otter aircraft. On 21 October 1961 the unit received its Squadron Standard for 25 years’ service as No. 119 and 424 Squadron. A reduction of the Auxiliary Force resulted in the squadron being disbanded on 1 April 1964. On 8 July 1968, with unification of the Canadian Forces, the squadron was reactivated as 424 Communications and Transport Squadron, operating from CFB Trenton, Ontario . The squadron has flown more than 14 different types of aircraft during its history.

424 (Tiger) Squadron is now a Transport and Rescue Squadron based at 8 Wing Trenton. To fulfil its roles, 424 Squadron operates the CH-146 Griffon helicopter and the CC-130H Hercules. 424 Squadron and 435 Transport and Rescue Squadron provide primary search and rescue response for the Trenton Search and Rescue Region (SRR), the largest in Canada. The Trenton SRR extends from Quebec to the British Columbia/Alberta border, and from the Canada/United States border to the North Pole. The Squadron crews one aircraft of each type on standby response posture in order to respond to distress cases as tasked by Joint Rescue Coordination Centre Trenton.

In addition to providing SAR response through a para-rescue capability, the CC-130H Hercules allows the squadron to conduct its transport role in Canada and around the world. The CH-146 Griffon enables rescues and medical evacuations from locations on land and over water. Both aircraft carry Search and Rescue Technicians onboard in order to provide urgent care to those in need. The members of 424 Squadron provide SAR response to incidents under the federal SAR mandate; all aircraft incidents and all marine incidents in waters under federal jurisdiction. They also support humanitarian missions and other SAR organizations when able. Wikipedia and www.canada.ca/en/air-force/corporate/squadrons/424-squadron.html

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