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Bruce, William A (Lieutenant)

Killed in Action 1918-05-25

Male Head

Birth Date: 1868-06-14 (age 49)

Born: Ashford, Kent, England

Mr. & Mrs. H. Bruce, Inverness, Scotland

Roberta Cowie

Home: Inverness, Scotland (parents)

Enlistment Date: 1914-01-01

Service
RAF
Unit
104 (B) Sqn- Squadron (RAF)
Strike Hard
Base
France
Rank
Lieutenant
Marshal
Air Chief MarshalA/C/M
Air MarshalA/M
Air Vice MarshalA/V/M
Air CommodoreA/C
Group CaptainG/C
Wing CommanderW/C
Squadron LeaderS/L
Flight LieutenantF/L
Flying OfficerF/O
Pilot OfficerP/O
Warrant Officer 1st ClassWO1
Warrant Officer 2nd ClassWO2
Flight SergeantFS
SergeantSGT
CorporalCPL
Senior AircraftmanSAC
Leading AircraftmanLAC
Aircraftman 1st ClassAC1
Aircraftman 2nd ClassAC2
Position
Pilot
Service Numbers
405107, CEF
1918-05-25: Bruce, and his gunner/observer 1455 SgtMaj David John Smith (British) were missing/presumed dead after leaving Sezanne, reporting for England. Their bodies were recovered from the wreckage of their aircraft near Commency, France.

Canada Source Canadian Virtual War Memorial

Commonwealth War Graves Commission Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Airco (pre de Havilland) DH 9 DH 9a

Airco DH.9 (Source Wikipedia

The Airco DH.9 (from de Havilland 9) also known after 1920 as the de Havilland DH.9 was a British single-engined biplane bomber developed and deployed during the First World War.

The DH.9 was a development of Airco's earlier successful DH.4, with which it shared many components. These were mated to an all-new fuselage and the BHP/Galloway Adriatic engine, which promised increased performance. Anticipating its usefulness, the type was ordered in very large numbers for Britain's Royal Flying Corps (RFC).

Upon entering service, the DH.9's performance was found to be unsatisfactory. The Adriatic engine was unreliable and failed to provide the expected power, which gave the DH.9 poorer performance than the aircraft it had been meant to replace. The performance deficit was blamed for the heavy losses they suffered over the Western Front. The redesigned DH.9A was fitted with a more powerful and reliable American Liberty L-12 engine which rectified the shortcomings of the original DH.9 model. Wikipedia

YouTube DH-9

Wkikpedia Wikipedia DH-9

General Harold A Skaarup Web Page

CASPIR Aircraft Groups:
Canadian Aircraft Losses (20)
last update: 2023-09-19 12:23:24

DH.9 C6266


104 (B) Sqn- Squadron (RAF) Strike Hard

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