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Barrett, John Hamilton (Pilot Officer)

Killed in Action 1942-10-14

Birth Date: 1922-01-18 (age 20)

Born: Dunheld Scotland

Son of John A. Barrett and Ena Constance Barrett; husband of Marjorie R. Barrett, of North Vancouver, British Columbia. B.Sc. (Dalhousie University, Halifax).

Husband of Marjorie R. Barrett, of North Vancouver, British Columbia. B.Sc. (Dalhousie University, Halifax).

Home: North Vancouver, British Columbia

Service
RCAF
Unit
2 FIS- Flying Instructor School
Base
Vulcan, Alberta, Canada
Rank
Pilot Officer
Marshal
Air Chief MarshalA/C/M
Air MarshalA/M
Air Vice MarshalA/V/M
Air CommodoreA/C
Group CaptainG/C
Wing CommanderW/C
Squadron LeaderS/L
Flight LieutenantF/L
Flying OfficerF/O
Pilot OfficerP/O
Warrant Officer 1st ClassWO1
Warrant Officer 2nd ClassWO2
Flight SergeantFS
SergeantSGT
CorporalCPL
Senior AircraftmanSAC
Leading AircraftmanLAC
Aircraftman 1st ClassAC1
Aircraftman 2nd ClassAC2
Position
Pilot
Service Numbers
J/14556

Sinking of the SS Caribou

Headline: U-Boat Torpedoes NS-Newfoundland Ferry Steamer With Loss of 117 Lives Including 16 Women 14 Children 101 Passengers and Crew Saved by Canadian Naval Craft Montreal Gazette October 17 1943

On the 14th October 1942, SS CARIBOU, on voyage from North Sydney, Nova Scotia, Canada to Port aux Basques, Newfoundland with passengers, was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U-69, 25 miles south of Port Aux Basques off Cabot Strait. 136 people died.

Story: CARIBOU (Capt. Taverner) was torpedoed by U-69 (Kapitanleutnant Ulrich Graf) while in convoy NL-9, on her regular run between Cape Breton and Newfoundland. Her escort, the minesweeper HMCS GRANDMERE had only short range asdic (sonar detection) and no radar. GRANDMERE did not detect the submarine but sighted it after the attack, giving chase with depth charges as the submarine dove.

U-69's torpedo struck at 2:21 am hitting CARIBOU's boilers. The explosion was very violent and the CARIBOU was ripped in two pieces. She sank in 5 minutes. Survivors were left in overcrowded lifeboats and clinging to wreckage until dawn when GRANDMERE returned from its unsuccessful hunt for U-69. Only 101 of the 237 people aboard survived. 31 crew, 57 military and 48 passengers died.

Part of the passengers on board were women and children, who were heading to Nova Scotia to welcome a contingent of RCN sailors home from overseas. The sinking caused alarm in the Canadian and Newfoundland public about the vulnerability of the St. Lawrence to submarine attack. reference: wrecksite.eu

Canada Source Sinking of the SS Caribou

Canada Source CBC Archives

General Uboat.net Details

Had a Bachelor of Science from Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia.

Canada Source Canadian Virtual War Memorial

Commonwealth War Graves Commission Commonwealth War Graves Commission

Find-A-Grave.com Find-A-Grave.com

Canada Primary Source Library and Archives Canada Service Files (may not exist)

Pilot Officer John Hamilton Barrett has no known grave.

others aboard SSCaribou

CASPIR Aircraft Groups:
Canadian Aircraft Losses (5)
last update: 2021-08-23 13:26:46

Ship SSCaribou

Sinking of the SS Caribou

Headline: U-Boat Torpedoes NS-Newfoundland Ferry Steamer With Loss of 117 Lives Including 16 Women 14 Children 101 Passengers and Crew Saved by Canadian Naval Craft Montreal Gazette October 17 1943

On the 14th October 1942, SS CARIBOU, on voyage from North Sydney, Nova Scotia, Canada to Port aux Basques, Newfoundland with passengers, was torpedoed and sunk by the German submarine U-69, 25 miles south of Port Aux Basques off Cabot Strait. 136 people died.

Story: CARIBOU (Capt. Taverner) was torpedoed by U-69 (Kapitanleutnant Ulrich Graf) while in convoy NL-9, on her regular run between Cape Breton and Newfoundland. Her escort, the minesweeper HMCS GRANDMERE had only short range asdic (sonar detection) and no radar. GRANDMERE did not detect the submarine but sighted it after the attack, giving chase with depth charges as the submarine dove.

U-69's torpedo struck at 2:21 am hitting CARIBOU's boilers. The explosion was very violent and the CARIBOU was ripped in two pieces. She sank in 5 minutes. Survivors were left in overcrowded lifeboats and clinging to wreckage until dawn when GRANDMERE returned from its unsuccessful hunt for U-69. Only 101 of the 237 people aboard survived. 31 crew, 57 military and 48 passengers died.

Part of the passengers on board were women and children, who were heading to Nova Scotia to welcome a contingent of RCN sailors home from overseas. The sinking caused alarm in the Canadian and Newfoundland public about the vulnerability of the St. Lawrence to submarine attack. reference: wrecksite.eu

Canada Source Sinking of the SS Caribou

Canada Source CBC Archives

General Uboat.net Details



2 FIS- Flying Instructor School (2 Flying Instructors School)

Formed as a sub-unit of No 15 Service Flying Training School at Claresholm, Alberta on 27 April 1942 Formed as an Independent Unit at Vulcan, Alberta on 3 August 1942. Moved to Pearce, Alberta on 3 May 1943 became inactive on 29 December 1944 disbanded on 20 January 1945

1942-04-27 Primary Location Claresholm, Alberta Canada
1942-08-03 Primary Location Vulcan, Alberta Canada
1943-05-03 Primary Location Pearce, Alberta Canada

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